Saturday, April 25, 2009

Short Pondering on Rejection

So I've been thinking a lot the last couple of weeks about the whole writer/query/agent/editor/publishing-fail debate. Naturally I'm too narcissistic to think about it in terms of other people. (And . . . I'm just tired of the whole thing in terms of reading about it. I don't think we really need to keep rehashing it publicly.)

I've not queried to agents or editors regarding a novel yet. I've sent out two short stories, both of which have been rejected a few times. But should I feel a sense of accomplishment that I'm getting more personal, detailed rejection letters than form letters? Or is that the norm for small and online mags? What do you think? You tell me.

15 comments:

Bevie said...

Can't speak to magazines. I have a short story I would like to submit, but can't find a publication which takes this kind of fiction.

I've queries to agents and got form letter rejections. Then, when the last agent responded so very quickly, I sent a thank you. (I had so wanted this agent to represent me.) She responded by sending me to Evil Editor's blog.

Can't say that's going to get me published, but I've met a lot of cool people from that, including the writer of this blog.

freddie said...

Likewise, Bevie!

Did you send in your query to EE, hmmmmmmm?

Bevie said...

Yeah, I did. I'm not hopeful anymore.

Whirlochre said...

Apart from my New Beginnings on EE's site and a piece of flash fiction, I have nothing "out there" so I'm not up to speed on the whole agent thing.

Whatever stage we're all at, the trick is to keep writing and keep doing the next best thing with it.

freddie said...

Right on, Whirl. : )

freddie said...

Why are you not hopeful anymore, Bev?

Sarah Laurenson said...

Getting a detailed letter is a good sign no matter what. It means the editor cared enough about your writing to be helpful. I don't think it matters if it's articles or how big the publisher is except the bigger places get more queirs and have less time to deal with them.

Kudos for putting it out there. Keep trying!

That's very interesting, Bevie.

freddie said...

Yeah, I think so, too, Sarah.

The whole #agentfail thing just got me thinking about the quality of rejection letters I've received. So far, even though they're rejection letters, I'm still fairly pleased.

Although I'm beginning to wonder nowadays whether my writing is getting worse instead of better. No joke. I'll just have to keep at it, I guess.

laughingwolf said...

hang in there, freddie...

i've got tons of rejections, too

discouraging, but i keep plugging away....

writtenwyrdd said...

If they take the time to respond with personal notes, I'd take that as meaning you are doing something right. Doesn't mean your writing is perfect, but it probably reached them emotionally on some level. They're busy, so I personally appreciate any personal notes.

Robin S. said...

According to Betsy Lerner's book - personal notes are rung four of the five rungs - and the fifth is being published.

I sent out 2 short stories - sporadically- in the last 2 years - and got several..."your story was strong, your story made it to the final cut, your story was very good, I liked the voice, the rhythm, etc - I just wished for a little more (insert whatever word they used here)".

I do think it makes a difference, and I think you should feel very good about this, especially given the economy in the pits and the horrendously large amount of competition writers have now.

Bevie said...

"Why are you not hopeful anymore, Bev?"

Not so far to fall emotionally when I fail again.

freddie said...

Awesome, everyone. I suspected I had something to feel good about. Thank you!!

Sarah Laurenson said...

BTW - a writing friend of mine became an agent. She approached me about representing me since she loved my writing. So I sent her the pages she requested and she turned me down. This business is subjective and crazy. But I'm sort of glad she turned me down after hearing her talk about the types of books and humor she didn't get. My MS falls into that category and I don't want an agent hawking my book unless she loves it. Sounds worse than no agent at all.

freddie said...

Oh, yeah, Sarah. I hear ya! Sometimes things happen and they seem crappy at the time, but can really be a blessing in disguise.